Monday, March 03, 2008

LoudStyle Links 71

abstract paintingAs seen on Twitter.

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Thursday, February 07, 2008

LoudStyle Links 69

ApparatAs seen on Twitter.

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Sunday, January 27, 2008

LoudStyle Links 68

Circles At PlayAs seen on Twitter.

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Tuesday, January 22, 2008

LoudStyle Links 67

Sid Dickens T192
  • Loving several of these Sid Dickens tiles, especially Opaque T192. I collected them in the 1990s when they were $60 each rather than today's $90 each.
  • Finally listening to Radiohead's NYE broadcast. They sound great.
  • Thinking we'll never see what the deal is with that island after JJ said "Mystery is more important than knowledge" in his TED Talk (via Eric)
  • Listening to Vampire Weekend's A-Punk way too many times.
  • Digging the TaskSwitchXP app for alt-tab app switching. It has plenty of config options and a tiny RAM footprint.
As seen on Twitter.

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Thursday, January 10, 2008

LoudStyle Links 66

Jackie SaccoccioAs seen on Twitter.

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Saturday, December 22, 2007

LoudStyle Links 63

Collage
  • Uploading abstract collages I made recently with cardstock, an old map, papers, and a clothing pattern, tinyurl.com/2buoec
  • Jamming to Ursula 1000's "hard-hitting breaks mix with a retro vibe - lot's of beeps, distorted bass," etc. tinyurl.com/37grtb
  • Making beats with an old freeware program called HammerHead Rhythm Station, www.threechords.com/hammerhead/
  • Scanned & posted a Batman and Robin ad for a 1966 sweepstakes to Flickr, tinyurl.com/2c95gh
As seen on Twitter.

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Wednesday, December 19, 2007

LoudStyle Links 61

Hilary Williams
  • Loving these "dense pieces that deal with the absurdity of our culture" by artist Hilary Williams, tinyurl.com/2sa4hg (via design-milk.com)
  • Listening to Diplo's fun remix of Spoon's Natural History cover Don't You Evah, tinyurl.com/2q5lh6
  • Downloading the Kleptones' mashup set from Bestival: Live'r Than You'll Ever Be, tinyurl.com/25m2h5 (via Matt @ Beatmixed.com)
  • Listening to the best songs of 2007 as picked by Paper Thin Walls' favorite music writers (download it or stream), tinyurl.com/2bd2yg
  • Paraphrasing: "All creative people have a little hater that lives inside our heads & tries to set up traps for us" tinyurl.com/29qs75
  • Jamming to a "super old Dr. Dre cassette from 1986 that he did on a four track in the back of the club he DJed at." tinyurl.com/2yr9w6
As seen on Twitter.

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Thursday, December 06, 2007

LoudStyle Links 58

  • Reading about Georges Seurat's 19th century drawings (tinyurl.com/yq4cnj) & viewing the online exhibition (tinyurl.com/yw3b5y) #
  • Listening to Girl Talk live with "completely new remixes and mash-ups alongside his officially released material" tinyurl.com/23cmka #
  • Realizing that to open animated GIFs in Photoshop CS3, I have to Import > Video Frames to Layers > File Name *.*, tinyurl.c ... #
  • Realizing I can't cleanly import animated GIFs with transparency into Photoshop CS3. I'm opening with Flash first to export as movie frames. #
  • Switching to Fireworks to perform animated GIF hocus pocus since there is no ImageReady CS3. #
  • Bobbing my head to DJ Z-Trip, a mashup master before they were called mashups. Lots of free downloads: djztrip.com/downloads.html #
Automatically posted by LoudTwitter.

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Sunday, December 02, 2007

LoudStyle Links 57

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Thursday, November 15, 2007

LoudStyle Links 55

  • Reminding myself that CTRL-ALT-T in Photoshop allows you to copy & move/change a layer, while CTRL-ALT-SHIFT-T repeats the copy & move/change. #
  • Contemplating a very interesting mixed media piece on Etsy full of circles of seemingly random stuff, tinyurl.com/2hmk3p #
  • Admiring another piece on Etsy - an interesting acrylic & enamel painting, tinyurl.com/293pzw #
Automatically posted by LoudTwitter.

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Tuesday, November 13, 2007

LoudStyle Links 53

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Wednesday, October 31, 2007

LoudStyle Links 50

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Wednesday, October 24, 2007

LoudStyle Links 47

  • Listening to Booka Shade's mix for the DJ Kicks series. Spinner is streaming the full album, tinyurl.com/2z9hm8 #
  • I'm losing my edge to the art-school Brooklynites in little jackets & borrowed nostalgia for the unremembered 80s, tinyurl.com/ys2m6m #
  • Reading about a million dollar painting that was found in the trash in NYC 20 years after it was stolen in Texas, tinyurl.com/2odntm #
Automatically posted by LoudTwitter.

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Thursday, October 18, 2007

LoudStyle Links 45

  • Wondering whether the two planned Star Wars TV shows (one live-action & one animated) could actually be any good, tinyurl.com/3asbr2 #
  • Listening to an old school house music mix by Zombie Disco Squad - the MP3 is on the Mad Decent Blog, maddecent.com/blog/?p=182 #
  • Listening to Common with Lily Allen from Common's latest release, "It's this thing now, that's drivin' me wild." tinyurl.com/237trq #
  • Blown away by Daft Punk's 10-minute Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger mix for Louis Vuitton, tinyurl.com/2lax4c #
  • Reading about artist Karl Benjamin & his colorful paintings, tinyurl.com/3dwgrm (slideshow: tinyurl.com/2l4yky) #
Automatically posted by LoudTwitter.

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Monday, October 15, 2007

LoudStyle Links 43

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Thursday, October 11, 2007

LoudStyle Links 42

  • Listening to a new Daft Punk track called "Too Long / Steam Machine" on myspace.com/daftpunk #
  • Watching the trailer for "My Kid Could Paint That," the documentary about child artist Marla Olmstead, tinyurl.com/29fg43 #
  • Laughing about Lupe Fiasco claiming to have never heard A Tribe Called Quest's "Midnight Marauders" album, tinyurl.com/324tpz #
  • Thinking the trailer for the movie Jumper looks really cool (plus it features Mace Windu and Darth Vader), www.jumperthemovie.com/ #
Automatically posted by LoudTwitter.

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Sunday, September 30, 2007

LoudStyle Links 37

  • Looking forward to the long awaited return of Photoshop Tennis, AKA Layer Tennis, layertennis.com. Friday's match is online. #
  • Wow, the Hampton is already sold out for SXSW Interactive, Film, and Music, tinyurl.com/2l5odx (glad I booked for Interactive early) #
  • Watching artist Phil Hansen create a portrait of Bruce Lee with karate chops of black paint, tinyurl.com/37qvl2 #
  • Looking through Time Magazines's list of the 100 Best TV Shows of All Time (many with clips), tinyurl.com/2mzqkm #
  • Listening to Electrocast 504 with Gorillaz, Daft Punk, Le Tigre, and LCD Soundsystem, tinyurl.com/yu2l38 #
  • Subscribing to the Radio Lab podcast. "What is music? How does it work? Why does it move us?" http://tinyurl.com/3b4ud4 (via @hotdogsladies) #
Automatically posted by LoudTwitter.

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Thursday, September 27, 2007

Twitter: LoudStyle Links 35

  • 11:03 "Well, perhaps Amazon can find a book or something about how to build a successful high-volume online store." tinyurl.com/2wd6wc #
  • 11:52 Considering the Geek Entertainment video podcast - I'm currently subscribed to CommandN, GeekBrief, Jetset, Mobuzz, and WebbAlert. #
  • 21:08 Loving the mixed media paintings of Nina Bovasso, tinyurl.com/23g6sa #
  • 21:25 Reading about new IT support, "The expertise you have as a 9-year-old may be obsolete by the time you're 12 or 13" tinyurl.com/2dqaex #
Automatically posted by LoudTwitter.

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Wednesday, September 26, 2007

Twitter: LoudStyle Links 34

  • 14:33 I'm optimistic about Amazon's new music download store with DRM-free MP3s at 256kbps VBR, tinyurl.com/yruhvk #
  • 15:05 Sonny J's "Can't Stop Moving" reminds me of the infectious tracks put out by the Avalanches a few years back, tinyurl.com/yt7tl7 #
  • 17:17 Reading Jeff Croft's summary of the Webmaster Jam Session this past weekend, tinyurl.com/32anqu #
  • 17:20 Digging Helen Durant's mixed media goat (third image down), tinyurl.com/2rubny #
  • 20:18 Watching John Maeda's Ted Talk, Simplicity Patterns. Rather than call his work "Eye Candy," he prefers "Eye Meat" tinyurl.com/3xh9wy #
Automatically posted by LoudTwitter.

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Sunday, September 23, 2007

Twitter: LoudStyle Links 33

  • 11:07 Reading Eric's Top 10 ways to NOT be a Web Designer Rockstar, tinyurl.com/2k66az #
  • 13:14 Noticing that admission to the Nasher sculpture museum is free from 10a-2p on the first Saturday each month, tinyurl.com/3446cy #
  • 13:20 Great design-related quote from Hans Hofman: "The ability to simplify means to eliminate the unnecessary so that the necessary may speak." #
  • 16:01 Agreeing with Rands' First Law of Information Management, tinyurl.com/2kq3ya #
  • 17:27 Checking out Stephen's poster "Getting from Tasks to Experiences: What's Next in Interface Design" tinyurl.com/2lvx7y #
  • 18:13 Reading that Nick Finck (@nickf) gives the Webmaster Jam Session a thumbs up, tinyurl.com/ysqljv #
Automatically posted by LoudTwitter.

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Saturday, September 15, 2007

Twitter: LoudStyle Links 28

  • 20:49 Watching Good Copy Bad Copy, a great (so far) documentary on sampling in music, on Google Video, tinyurl.com/32bj3o #
  • 21:03 Listening to Girl Talk mash up Elton John's Tiny Dancer with Biggie's Juicy. It starts at 4 minutes - pure magic, tinyurl.com/36jww2 #
  • 21:37 The documentary Good Copy Bad Copy covers the affect of copyrights in music and film throughout the world, tinyurl.com/32bj3o #
  • 21:39 Thinking these would be interesting questions to ask candidates being considered for your web team, tinyurl.com/2k7daq #
  • 21:47 Loving the abstract art of Jennifer Sanchez, tinyurl.com/3d7cha. A print is available here, tinyurl.com/358pky #
  • 22:40 Watching John Stewart, "Dave Petraeus, Dave Petraeus...Iraq Me Dave Petraeus!" & the finale "It's a worm hole!" tinyurl.com/2l7djw #
Automatically posted by LoudTwitter.

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Monday, September 10, 2007

Twitter: LoudStyle Links 27

  • 14:28 Disabling Firefox extension Firebug to slow any memory leak (right click on its icon). I can re-enable it for use, tinyurl.com/2caxvn #
  • 13:03 Thinking I'd rather update Twitter from my browser sidebar & not in a slick standalone app line Snook's Snitter, snook.ca/snitter/ #
  • 13:05 Reading "25 Art Forms to try and Artists who already use them" and thinking I have a lot of catching up to do, tinyurl.com/ytc7q3 #
  • 13:09 Listening to the latest CMG Podcast that includes tracks by Spoon, Coconut Records, Wheat, and Vampire Weekend, tinyurl.com/yu4pa8 #
  • 13:15 Reading "Beyond The 'T' - Coordinating Realistic Design Teams" www.peterme.com/?p=580 via www.xplane.com/xblog/ #
  • 16:10 Digging this typographic collage print by Enja Wong, tinyurl.com/25f996 #
  • 22:25 Buying a pack of Moleskine Cahiers - small journals for notes or sketching, tinyurl.com/25hpzb #
Automatically posted by LoudTwitter.

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Tuesday, September 04, 2007

Twitter: LoudStyle Links 25

  • 13:04 Installing the highly configurable ClocX desktop clock for Windows. I like having it faded on my second monitor, www.clocx.net/ #
  • 13:11 Trying the Firefox extension Tweetbar. Its Twitter sidebar has a multi-line entry area and looks like Twitter.com, tinyurl.com/33f6qf #
  • 17:45 Looking through a couple abstract paintings from Ingrid Calame's upcoming exhibition Constellations, tinyurl.com/yqu777 #
  • 18:17 Staring at the circle paintings of John Dempcy, www.johndempcy.com/ via dearada.typepad.com/ #
  • 19:40 Watching Rothko's Rooms on Ovation TV, a new network focused on the arts, tinyurl.com/2w6v25 #
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Thursday, August 30, 2007

Twitter: LoudStyle Links 22

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Saturday, August 25, 2007

Twitter: LoudStyle Links 18

  • 09:15 Checking the browser war stats as Firefox continues to expand. It will soon pass IE6 & is still ahead of IE7, tinyurl.com/yoxq8r #
  • 19:39 Looking at a cool painting/drawing/collage piece called Fluctuation by Lisa Carney on Boundless Gallery, tinyurl.com/24tkgf #
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Friday, August 24, 2007

Twitter: LoudStyle Links 17

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Thursday, August 23, 2007

Twitter: LoudStyle Links 16

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Thursday, August 16, 2007

Twitter: LoudStyle Links 11

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Monday, July 30, 2007

Twitter: LoudStyle Links 2

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Sunday, July 15, 2007

Art: Charley Harper

Charley HarperFrom Drawn!:
One of my favorite influences, illustrator Charley Harper died this past Sunday, June 10th, of pneumonia, in Cincinnati, Ohio. He was 84. Charley was wildly popular among bird enthusiasts for his stylized depictions of various birds, not to mention wildlife in general. He had a great simplicity to his art, a certain modern clarity when depicting animals and nature.
View Charley Harper's work on GalleryOne.com and in a short video on YouTube hosted by Todd Oldham.

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Wednesday, June 13, 2007

Art: All Atwitter

Twitter asks the question "What are you doing?" Here are the art-related responses from my Twitter feed.

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Tuesday, May 29, 2007

Art: T.Scott Stromberg

T.Scott StrombergWhile reading a post on the Geniant blog recently, I noticed it stated that the author could be found during his time off "relaxing in his studio while listening to classic jazz and attacking a freshly primed canvas with a palette and paintbrush." I rarely (OK, never) find art I enjoy when following leads from tech blog sidebars, but I must have been in an optimistic mood.

My Google search paid off when I found the great abstract paintings by T.Scott Stromberg. He talks about them in his bio:
The Swirling Eddies are created by first using a squeegee to apply the initial under painting. Then a pinstripping brush is used to create the spontaneous swirls. I then fill in the negative space with texture and color blends. The process of creating this work is very primitive, cathartic and divine. I feel the results are powerful. I am hoping to increase the scale of this work in the near future.
From my own dabblings in abstract art, I understand his feelings. I may have to get a pinstripping brush to experiment with myself.

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Thursday, April 19, 2007

Art: Julie Evans

Julie EvansFrom Julie Evan's exhibition press release:
Her work brings together influences of contemporary Western abstraction with those of traditional, Eastern miniature painting, combing the most delicate patterning and layering with bold forms and swathes of intensely rich color.
View more of her work on the websites below:

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Wednesday, January 24, 2007

Art: My Sketches

20070120I've been posting pencil sketches to my Flickr account for a year now. The sketches are usually spontaneous creations - I figure them out as the pencil moves along. Drawing is a quick creative outlet when I don't have the time or energy to crack open the paint cans. Take a look.

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Wednesday, January 10, 2007

Art: Brian Eno

77 Million Paintings By Brian Eno
Brian Eno has released 77 Million Paintings, which sees the continued evolution of Eno’s exploration into light as an artist’s medium and the aesthetic possibilities of “generative software.”

The 77 Million Paintings software disc uses the screen of your computer or television to create a constantly evolving painting. The painting is generated from hand-made slides that are randomly combined by the computer using specially developed software.
[via guinn9]

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Saturday, January 06, 2007

Art: My Painting "Heavy"

Thanks to William for including my recent painting "Heavy" in the Artist Hideout Screensaver. View more of my work at loudstyle.com/art and be sure to bookmark the Artist Hideout.

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Friday, January 05, 2007

Art: My Painting, Untitled

Here is a recent untitled painting I posted to Flickr. It is a 24 by 36 inch acrylic on canvas piece. I'm experimenting with bringing the geometry of my earlier paintings into the more chaotic style I've had the past couple years. View more of my work at loudstyle.com/art and see what I'm offering for sale at Etsy.

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Thursday, December 21, 2006

Art: Christopher H. Martin

Halo 1Halo 3Here are a couple of Christopher H. Martin's latest pieces followed by his homepage to view the rest of the gallery:

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Tuesday, December 19, 2006

Art: Anatoly Sokolov

Anatoly SokolovI don't recall how I stumbled upon the gallery of Russian artist Anatoly Sokolov, but I'm glad I did. I've included a snapshot of a tempura on canvas piece called Entry. View the rest of his work on art-sokolov.com.

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Wednesday, December 06, 2006

Art: Thaneeya McArdle

Thaneeya McArdleI've really enjoyed several of Thaneeya McArdle's recent pieces:

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Tuesday, December 05, 2006

Art: From Flickr

Henry ArnéRachel BachmanI'd like to share a couple more paintings I spotted on Flickr. These two are from Henry Arné and Rachel Bachman.

Click the images for a larger view (the All Sizes links on the Flickr pages will lead to the full size images).

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Monday, November 20, 2006

Art: Art Blogs

Here are links to ten art-related blogs I follow:

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Monday, November 13, 2006

Art: Malarky on Jasper Johns

Jasper Johns Flag (detail)Malarkey discusses Jasper Johns' Flag and design trends:
Seeing Flag up close, pushing my nose as near as the gallery attendant would allow, gave me a totally different appreciation of the work. It is a complex mix of paint and collage, with cuttings from newspapers showing through the layers of paint. Rather than being flat, Flag has real texture and a wonderful three-dimensional quality that has inspired me to bring a little of its richness into my designs.
See the rest of Malarkey's post at stuffandnonsense.co.uk.

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Friday, November 03, 2006

Art: Jackson Pollock & Flat Form

Jackson Pollock's Number 5, 1948 (detail)The New York Times reported that Jackson Pollock's "Number 5, 1948" sold at possibly the highest price ever paid for a painting. When looking up commentary on the piece, I ran across an essay by Christopher Dylan Bailey on what he calls flat form that articulated many thoughts I've had about my own artwork. He uses "Number 5, 1948" as an example:
There is no depth here, not much "stands out" or is "more important" than anything else, there is no "climactic point," or "center pole" or such on the surface. Nothing is important, because everything is important. On the one hand, one can see this as a complete lack of richness---just overall greyness. On the other hand, one could see this as remarkably rich: the picture is filled with tiny "sub-pictures", micro-pictures, anywhere you look. Zoom in on a 2" square anywhere on the painting, and you are rewarded with an interesting little structure, a powerful color combination, or a set of expressive gestures colliding in some interesting way.
A large goal I've always had with my artwork has always been to draw viewers in to look at the detail within each piece. I once took this to the literal extreme by creating a grid on a painting. I can spend hours looking at my own artwork examining and appreciating "sub-pictures" I've never noticed.

Mr. Bailey continues discussing paintings like Pollock's:
They are, in a sense, irreducible. If one is unable to zoom in on the detail, there's no point in looking at them. In a way, the artist has forced us to look at the detail, or not to look at all.
Well said.

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Friday, October 13, 2006

Art: Andy Warhol

Andy WarholCarnegie Magazine comments on Andy Warhol's Flowers series:
It was in 1964, however, that Warhol embarked on one of his most successful projects using the flower motif. In a series of paintings based on a photograph of hibiscus blossoms, Warhol drenched the flowers’ floppy shape with vibrant color and set them against a background of rich undergrowth, transforming them into psychedelic indoor décor.

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Monday, October 02, 2006

Art: James Whistler

James Whistler
In 1877 the critic John Ruskin denounced Whistler's Nocturne in Black and Gold: The Falling Rocket (1875; Detroit Institute of Arts), accusing him of "flinging a pot of paint in the public's face", and Whistler sued him for libel the following year. . . Potential patrons were repelled by the negative publicity surrounding the case, and the expense of the trial led to Whistler's bankruptcy in 1879.
[via RyhopeWood]

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Tuesday, September 26, 2006

Art: From Flickr

I thought I'd share a couple paintings I liked on Flickr. These two are from Craig Moser and Alex Itin. Click the images for a larger view.

Alex ItinCraig Moser

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Monday, September 25, 2006

Art: My Painting "Bloomdido" (2006)

Bloomdido (detail), 2006Bloomdido, 2006This is a painting I did in July named "Bloomdido" after a Bird & Diz track from 1950 - I often listen to jazz while painting.

It is acrylic paint on a 24 by 48 inch canvas with some wood stain and a matte varnish.

"Bloomdido" is available in my Etsy store.

Click the photos for larger images on Flickr.


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Monday, September 04, 2006

Art: Hans Hofmann

Hans HofmannA quote from Clement Greenberg's essay on Hans Hofmann:
Yet the very fact that Cathedral teeters on the edge of a kind of art like Mondrian's is one of the things that give it its climactic quality as a work that sums up the realizations of a whole epoch of modernist art, and at the same time points toward the next one-in which geometrical and painterly drawing will become indistinguishable because they will have cancelled each other out under the pressures of color.
You may view more of Hofman's work on HansHofmann.net or read more from Clement Greenberg.

[via the children's book Colors ]

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Saturday, September 02, 2006

Art: Omar Chacon

Omar ChaconArt MoCo describes the work of Omar Chacon:
Omar Chacon's paintings are deceptive and can be considered sculptural in that he builds them up using pieces of paint as the compositional elements. What appear to be organized brushstrokes of stripes of paint are carefully applied decals of dried paint from previously conceived brushstrokes or drips.
From the Pelican Press:
This work is fresh and original. Chacon is obsessed with color, segments, rows and grids – and yet he breaks free of all of these with each composition. He seems to have absorbed lessons from Klimt and Mondrian, respectively, in his jewel-like colors and his rectangular forms that pulse across the surface. Klee comes to mind too, in his interest in variations.
View more of Omar Chacon's work on Lincart.com.

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Sunday, August 27, 2006

Art: Robert Weingarten

Robert Weingarten
Robert Weingarten’s photographs of artists’ palettes bridge the gap between realism and abstraction, presenting details of both saturated pigments and the visual landscapes of artists’ studios. These images allow a microcosmic view of the materials and methods of more than twenty contemporary painters . . .
View examples on the Corcoran Gallery and Marlborough Gallery websites .

[via Thinking About Art]

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Saturday, July 08, 2006

Art: The Man Who Heard His Paintbox Hiss

Ossian Ward describes the affects of Wassily Kandinsky's synaesthesia:
Kandinsky achieved pure abstraction by replacing the castles and hilltop towers of his early landscapes with stabs of paint or, as he saw them, musical notes and chords that would visually 'sing' together. In this way, his swirling compositions were painted with polyphonic swathes of warm, high-pitched yellow that he might balance with a patch of cold, sonorous blue or a silent, black void. Rainbird describes how the artist used musical vocabulary 'to break down the external walls of his own art'.
[via Design Observer: Observed]

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Monday, July 03, 2006

Art: Tom Moody

Tom MoodyAaron Yassin interviews Tom Moody:
In studio visits people often say these paper pieces look richer and more complicated in person than on the website. It's true that there are more details—there's the interaction of reflected light with paper and ink—and that there's a whole different gestalt, to use a fancy term, when you encounter the work in physical space, which the camera (and therefore the browser) doesn't capture.
[via PaperCity magazine]

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Monday, June 12, 2006

Art: Cecily Brown

Cecily Brown on Rose-Colored GlassesDavid Cohen describes Cecily Brown on artcritical.com:
Ms. Brown’s attitude is postmodern, her tastes figurative, and her modus operandi abstract: This all adds up to art that’s an energetic mess. In her case, the sum of individual parts actually *is* greater than the whole, for hers is an art of beautiful bits and bobs that willfully evade composition, closure, or any kind of sustainable reading.
View her work on artnet and the Rose-Colored Glasses blog (be sure to view the images directly to see them full-size).

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Sunday, April 09, 2006

Art: James Dalglish

James DalglishLeslie Stuart Curtis reviews James Dalglish: Infinite Harvest:
Dalglish has found a number of reasons to be happy about painting -- mark-making, spontaneity and even the critical dialogue that once centered around such activities. This work forms a nexus between continuation of tradition and a glimpse at what painting might be like in the next millennium. John Ash once said that Dalglish might be seen as one of 'the last of the heroic American abstractionists' or, alternatively, 'the first of an entirely new mystico-televisual breed.'

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Wednesday, March 29, 2006

Art: Larry Poons

Larry PoonsThe Jacobson Howard Gallery describes the work of Larry Poons:
Larry Poons is acclaimed for his inventive, quirky color work and his zeal for paint and surface ... In these new pieces, Poons relies entirely on brushwork where before his process involved a range of technique from pouring paint to collage.

The results are dense, vibrant surfaces that sometimes take on an exhilarating scale. The finished works reflect the constant motion in his process: the paintings are optically alive.
View his work on jacobsonhoward.com.

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Tuesday, March 28, 2006

Art: Sam Francis

Sam Francis
Sometimes considered a second-generation Abstract Expressionist, Francis' work of the 1950's and 1960's was abstract, luminous and painterly rather than gestural. Influenced by the works of Mark Rothko and Clyfford Still, Francis' 'signature' paintings of the early 1950's are overlays of serial but asymmetrical biomorphic forms saturated with color.
View the work of Sam Francis on the Andreas Baumgartl and Broadbent websites or in this Broadbent catalog (PDF).

[via guinn9]

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Sunday, March 26, 2006

Art: James Nares

James NaresThe Albright-Knox Art Gallery website describes the work of James Nares:
His process is a painstaking one of trial and error, often requiring as many as a hundred or more attempts before arriving at a final image. Nares uses a squeegee to remove wet paint and to wipe away unsuccessful gestures, as he works to vary the rhythm and speed of his brush to produce the perfect stoke. The final image, set against a brilliant white ground, results with a vibrant, almost photographic quality to it.
View his work on these sites: You may also view a cool picture of him working.

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Friday, March 24, 2006

Art: Shawn Ardoin

Shawn Ardoin
Shawn Ardoin is a passionate artist. He is passionate about fish. He is passionate about the simple shapes of circles and squares. He is passionate about strong, rich, bold color. Combine these passions and the unique art of Shawn Ardoin comes to life on canvas.
[via an episode of MTV Cribs]

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Thursday, March 23, 2006

Art: The Drawings Of Tom Judd

Take a few minutes to browse the drawings of Tom Judd:Tom Judd
365 pages ago I had a very silly idea. Draw a page everyday for one year. Each day I spent around 1 hour on the page, sometimes more, sometimes less. There was never any planning or preparation, I would just go at it whenever I had a spare moment in my day and had something I needed to write or draw. Some of the drawings are observational and some are just plain weird. Monsters and things seem to crop up a lot (robots too).
[via one digital life]

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Monday, March 20, 2006

Art: Jasper Johns

Jasper JohnsFrom the Wikipedia entry on Jasper Johns:
In contrast to the concept of macho 'artist hero' as ascribed to Abstract Expressionist figures such as Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning, whose paintings are fully indexical (that is, standing effectively as an all-over canvas signature), 'Neo-Dadaists' like Johns and Robert Rauschenberg seem preoccupied with a lessening of the reliance of their art on indexical qualities, seeking instead to create meaning solely through the use of conventional symbols, painted indexically in mockery of the hallowed individuality of the Abstract Expressionists.
View the work of Jasper Johns on the Columbia University and Museum of Modern Art websites.

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Sunday, February 19, 2006

Art: Sketches

I recently began drawing for a few minutes almost every day. Jason's post Keeping a Sketchbook reminded me to scan and upload some sketches. There are a few below and more on Flickr.

A photo on Flickr A photo on Flickr A photo on Flickr A photo on Flickr

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Wednesday, January 04, 2006

Art: Alfred Harris

Alfred HarrisThe Froelick Gallery site describes the work of Alfred Harris:
Silhouettes, positive/negative space, tracery, and line drawing are constants in Alfred Harris’ evolving painting career. His 20 year oeuvre spanning source material from the written word to figurative drawing presents from a core concept of abstraction. Harris shreds once-organized compositions and reassembles them under glossed resin to create bold, collaged paintings.

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Saturday, December 10, 2005

Art: My Paintings On Flickr And At Metropia

I posted six of my paintings to Flickr, which are also available in a Flash slideshow. You may click through to individual paintings and "See different sizes" as large as 1024 by 768. Four of these are for sale at Metropia on Beltline in Addison. Their hours are Monday through Friday, 10 am-7 pm; Saturday, 10 am-6 pm; and Sunday, 12-6 pm.

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Wednesday, December 07, 2005

Art: Modern Military And Jet Set Ruins

[via happy place]

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Monday, December 05, 2005

Art: Brian Bent

Brian Bent
Self taught and influenced by the ‘Contemporary’ period of design and architecture of the 50’s, Southern California artist Brian Bent’s dynamic illustrative paintings of enamel on plywood are high energy with definitive flying rhomboids and vibrant colors.

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Tuesday, November 29, 2005

Art: My Painting "Orange Crush" (2005)

Acrylic on canvas with matte varnish, 40 inches by 30 inches. Painted in October 2005.

Orange Crush

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Thursday, November 17, 2005

Art: Jun Kaneko

Jun Kaneko
Geometry is a topic artist Jun Kaneko understands impeccably well. Best known for his large-scale, vertical ceramic sculptures, Kaneko creates simplified forms and accentuates them with glazed surface patterns. His obsession with pattern is evident, as is his interest in challenging dualities. For him, there is no political agenda attached, no complicated analyzations to dissect. He creates them purely for personal pleasure as an expression of his structural accomplishments and his jovial appreciation of life.
As described on the Gerald Peters Gallery, Dallas website. The photo is from Artnet.com

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Tuesday, November 15, 2005

Art: The Kids Aren’t All Right

...An education, particularly in art history and technique, can be valuable to a young artist, and studying with your heroes can be inspiring. What happens too often in these situations, though, is that we find young artists simply emulating their instructors, rather than finding and honing their own aesthetics and points of view about the world, society, themselves.
From The Kids Aren’t All Right in the LA Weekly.

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Sunday, November 06, 2005

Art: Umberto Boccioni, 1913

Umberto Boccioni
In Unique Forms of Continuity in Space, Boccioni puts speed and force into sculptural form. The figure strides forward. Surpassing the limits of the body, its lines ripple outward in curving and streamlined flags, as if molded by the wind of its passing.

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Wednesday, November 02, 2005

Art: Wassily Kandinsky

Wassily Kandinsky, Composition VIII
Ironically, Kandinsky's work moved in a direction that was of much greater abstraction than that which was pioneered by the Impressionists. It was not long before his talent surpassed the constraints of art school and he began exploring his own ideas of painting - 'I applied streaks and blobs of colors onto the canvas with a palette knife and I made them sing with all the intensity I could...'
From the WebMuseum: Kandinsky, Wassily.

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Saturday, October 29, 2005

Art: Found Photos

This is a fascinating photo gallery:
The pages below show prints I made from processing film I found in old cameras. In many cases the exposed films were over fifty years old. You are seeing them for the first time as they were lost by the photographers that took these images.
[via Design Weblog]

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Wednesday, October 26, 2005

Art: Action Painting

From Wikipedia:
Action painting, sometimes called "gestural abstraction", is a style of painting in which paint is spontaneously dribbled, splashed or smeared onto the canvas, rather than being carefully applied. The resulting work emphasizes the physical act of painting itself.
The preceding art of Kandinsky and Mondrian had attempted to detract itself from the portrayal of objects and instead tried to tingle and tantalize the emotions of the viewer. Action Art took this a step further, using Freud’s ideas of the subconscious as its underlying foundations.

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Tuesday, October 11, 2005

Art: Hotel Fox

Browse the rooms of Hotel FOX:
...International artists from the fields of graphic design, urban art and illustration turned Hotel Fox in central Copenhagen into the world’s most exciting and creative lifestyle hotel.

61 rooms, 21 artist, 1,000 ideas
Each room is an individual piece of art.
[via Sparkplug]

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Monday, September 26, 2005

Art: Mark Rothko

Mark RothkoThe National Gallery of Art has a brief and informative review of the life and work of Mark Rothko:
For him, eschewing representation permitted greater clarity, "the elimination of all obstacles between the painter and the idea and between the idea and the observer." As examples of such obstacles, Rothko gave "memory, history, or geometry, which are swamps of generalization from which one might pull out parodies of ideas (which are ghosts) but never an idea in itself. To achieve this clarity is, inevitably, to be understood."

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Saturday, September 24, 2005

Art: Notes On Making Art

I enjoyed Sven's The Scarlet Letters: Notes on Making Art. Here's an excerpt:
Work fast. Creativity is exciting. If you're not judging while you're making, then you can just throw things together as fast as your mind can move. You're smart; if you don't like what you've made, you'll know immediately. You might not know what to do about the problem you perceive... Don't "think", standing there cogitating -- try things. If your hands are in motion, you can be generating new permutations. The one that you want to pick will come out on its own time.
[via 43 Folders]

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Wednesday, September 21, 2005

Art: Liquid Sculpture

Liquid SculptureHigh-speed and Fine Art Photography of Drops and Splashes:
Liquid Sculpture is the process of creating shapes by dropping and splashing water, or other liquids. These sculptures are then photographed, since they last only a few thousandths of a second. Creating and capturing these engaging forms requires careful manipulation of the materials and precise control of the lighting and timing.
[via blogdex]

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Tuesday, September 13, 2005

Art: Christopher H. Martin Interview

The reward then, and still today, is to finish a piece that moves me, or a piece that confronts me. I want to feel something as a viewer as opposed to an artist. Once I experienced that feeling, my paintings became a very important part of life. As a painter, I think you have to allow yourself to look at art both ways - as a viewer and an artist.
From an interview with Christopher H. Martin.

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Thursday, September 08, 2005

Art: Ingrid Calame

View an installation by painter Ingrid Calame (especially numbers 7 and 9). The Los Angeles County Museum of Art's website describes Calame's work:
Every one of the colored shapes is a precise tracing of a stain found at a particular spot on a city sidewalk. You probably walk right over stains like these every day, but artist Ingrid Calame notices them and reproduces them life-size in her paintings. So even though the painting looks very abstract, each of the shapes in the composition is an accurate record of something real.
[via guinn9]

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Monday, September 05, 2005

Art: Marshall Sokoloff Photography

Jim Coudal describes the work of Marshall Sokoloff:
Marshall Sokoloff has captured a series of beautiful geometric photographs full of these colors and the rusty textures created by the sea bashing into steel. Interrupted by numerals indicating how high or low the ships ride in the water, or by fraying ropes, the shapes of the gently curving hulls extend beyond the rectangle of the frame on all four sides, compacting their three-dimensionality into powerfully concentrated two-dimensional compositions.
[via cityofsound]

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Thursday, September 01, 2005

Art: Mastery of Accident

From the June 2005 issue of I.D. article on Joshua Davis:
Chaos is currently his work's dominant theme. He not only encourages randomness, but also manages to control it. He's been dabbling in artistic mess, on and off, since the mid-'90s. While studying illustration and communication design at Pratt Institute, he liked to freeze or bake paintings to see how the stress affected pigment. One of his favorite inspirations of late is Jackson Pollock. "I'm not as crazy about his work visually as I am conceptually," Davis says, referring to Pollock's mastery of accident.
[via xBlog]

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Thursday, August 18, 2005

Art: Art on the Net: The Second Wave

BusinessWeek's Art on the Net: The Second Wave:

Critics still insist that unlike books, clothing, and other consumer goods, art really has to be experienced in person before deciding whether or not it's the right fit. But with some 126 million Americans already buying an increasing number of goods electronically, a new batch of entrepreneurs is banking on a bright future in online art.
A couple examples cited in the article are BoundlessGallery and The Guild.

[via Design Observer]

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Sunday, July 31, 2005

Art: Ernest Briggs

The Baruch College website describes the work of Ernest Briggs:
From dense layers of calligraphic brushstrokes to broad, sweeping passages of luminous color, Ernest Briggs's paintings from the 1950s bristle with the artist's sense of elation at leaving traditional image-making behind. Briggs was an active participant in the later wave of Abstract Expressionism, the revolution in abstract painting that secured New York City's position as the art capitol of the world in the post-World War II period.

The Abstract Expressionists celebrated the performative act of painting and the recording of the artist's subconscious as central themes of their art.
View Ernest Briggs's paintings in the Anita Shapolsky Gallery's current and past exhibits.

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Monday, July 04, 2005

Art: Linda Besemer

Linda Besemer makes it evident that a painting's surface is at least two-sided; it is a thing with a front and a back. Added into her heady mix is her insistence that a painting need not reiterate the illusion that it is a flat or static thing. Rather a state of potentiality, which Pollock's poured paintings embody, is the goal Besemer achieves in her paintings, which seem as if they could be rolled or unrolled further, or even folded again.
Click the "Next" link above each painting on cohanandleslie.com to browse some of Linda Besemer's work.

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Saturday, June 25, 2005

Art: Matisse, His Art and His Textiles

The exhibition Matisse, His Art and His Textiles. The Fabric of Dreams will be on display at the Royal Academy of Arts in London and then the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York this year. Dr. Janet McKenzie describes it on Studio International:
The premise of 'Matisse, His Art and His Textiles' is that textiles were 'the key to (Matisse's) visual imagination'. Hilary Spurling has recently published the second volume of her scholarly and impressive biography of Matisse, which inspired this current exhibition. In her catalogue, she admits that a comprehensive study of the role played by textiles in Matisse's career is not possible; nonetheless, she puts forward a most convincing argument for the importance of fabrics in his work, which, she argues, stimulated and released his creative powers. The exhibition aims to show that the essential properties of fabrics enabled Matisse to break through to a new level of pictorial reality. In the past, art historians and critics have emphasised Matisse's genius as a colourist; his decorative materials have been viewed in the general realm of 'oriental influence'. John Berger, however, captured the essence of his powers: 'He clashed his colours together like cymbals, and the effect was like a lullaby.'

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Thursday, June 16, 2005

Quotes: Matisse's Dream

What I dream of is an art of balance, of purity and serenity devoid of troubling or depressing subject matter - a soothing, calming influence on the mind, rather like a good armchair which provides relaxation from physical fatigue.
From Henri Matisse, 1869-1954, via the May issue of icon.

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Wednesday, June 15, 2005

Art: Pollock on Art

Jackson Pollock from Constable.net's Artists on Art:
I continue to get further away from the usual painter's tools such as easel, palette, brushes, etc. I prefer sticks, trowels, knives and dripping fluid paint or a heavy impasto with sand, broken glass and other foreign matter added.

When I am in my painting, I'm not aware of what I'm doing. It is only after a sort of 'get acquainted' period that I see what I have been about. I have no fears about making changes, destroying the image, etc., because the painting has a life of its own. I try to let it come through. It is only when I lose contact with the painting that the result is a mess. Otherwise there is pure harmony, an easy give and take, and the painting comes out well.

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Sunday, May 15, 2005

Art: Newly Discovered Works By Jackson Pollock

Jackson Pollock DiscoveredFrom CNN:
The son of a New York photographer says he has discovered 32 unrecorded works by the late American abstract painter Jackson Pollock. If determined to be authentic, the cache could be worth millions of dollars.

Alex Matter, son of Herbert Matter - a close friend of Pollock's - announced in a statement Tuesday that he found a package of 22 of the artist's signature drip paintings on drawing board paper and 10 other works consisting of enamel drawings and unfinished paintings in 2003, all preserved in a storage space belonging to his father, who died in 1984.
[via guinn9]

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Sunday, May 08, 2005

Art: Glass Paperweight (1960)

I made a purchase yesterday to add to my small collection:
Beautiful art glass paperweight made in 1960 from very thick, crystal clear glass, holding in sommerso, the most beautiful combination of colors in a twisted, swirled free form pattern within. A few scattered, variable size bubbles add to the suspended optics of the pattern. Best description of shape is that of a rectangular pillow which has been fluffed and plumped. 4-1/2" x 3-1/8" x 2-1/4". Signed what appears to say "Jerusalem," and 1-31-60.
The definition of sommerso from 20th Century Glass:
This is a glass coated with a thick layer of colourless transparent glass, or with a glass which has a colour different from the one of the backing. It consists of a layer of coloured glass with the inclusion of air bubbles and gold leaf, more rarely with the subsequent application of rods in Pulegoso glass, coated with a colourless transparent layer about one inch thick. Many Muranese glass factories extensively took up this technique with very considerable results.

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Sunday, April 17, 2005

Art: My Painting "Black Hole Sun" (2004)

Black Hole Sun













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Tuesday, April 12, 2005

Art: My Painting "Sway" (2004)

Sway








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Tuesday, April 05, 2005

Art: Roberto Matta

Roberto MattaFrom Kathy Zimmerer:
All of his works transform and change with meditative viewing, revealing the rich inner life of a Surrealist artist immersed in the poetry of line, space, color and motion.
Tim Rock's matta-art.com features hundreds of Matta's works sorted by era.

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Monday, March 28, 2005

Art: My Painting "Red Walk" (2005)

Red Walk

















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Thursday, March 24, 2005

Art: Jean-Paul Riopelle

Jean-Paul RiopelleJean-Paul Riopelle, 1923-2002:
Canadian abstract expressionist painter who produced most of his work in postwar France. His works appear in New York City's Museum of Modern Art and London's Tate Gallery. He was the first Canadian to win an award at the Venice Biennale, in 1962.
[Bio | Work]

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Friday, March 18, 2005

Quotes: Pop Art

I am for an art that takes its forms from the lines of life itself, that twists and extends and accumulates and spits and drips and is heavy and coarse and blunt and sweet and stupid as life itself.
From artist Claes Oldenbourg.

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Thursday, March 17, 2005

Art: 50 People See

50 People SeeThere is a beautiful and interesting set of merged photos on Flickr titled 50 people see:
I wrote a program to blend Flickr images which share the same tags. No human is involved in choosing, positioning, or blending the images.

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Saturday, March 12, 2005

Art: Giant Steps

Giant StepsMichal Levy's animation matches every note from John Coltrane's saxaphone in the wonderful Giant Steps.

[via Drawn!]

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Wednesday, March 02, 2005

Art: Reality (on TV) Reaches Art World

In the 1970's when I started in the art world, no self-respecting artist would have stood in line to try to get on a television show," said Jeffrey Deitch, whose gallery, Deitch Projects, is helping to create an art-reality show called Artstar.
[via guinn9]

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Monday, January 31, 2005

Art: Artfacts Artist Ranking

The Artist Ranking orders artists in an ordinal scaling according to their recognition in the eyes of professionals (i.e. curators, gallery owners).

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Friday, January 28, 2005

Art: My Painting "Courtyard" (2003)

Courtyard








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