Friday, December 21, 2007

LoudStyle Links 62

Record EnvelopeAs seen on Twitter.

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Wednesday, September 05, 2007

Twitter: LoudStyle Links 26

Automatically posted by LoudTwitter.

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Monday, January 09, 2006

Architecture: Jubilee Church

Jubilee ChurchArchNewsNow describes Jubilee Church:
The project features concrete, stucco, travertine, and glass. Three dramatic concrete shells arc in graduated heights from 56 to 88 feet that bring to mind gliding white sails. Glass ceilings and skylights in the church span the entire length of the building filling the space with natural light. At night, light emanates from within creating an ethereal presence and animating the landscape.

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Monday, December 05, 2005

Art: Brian Bent

Brian Bent
Self taught and influenced by the ‘Contemporary’ period of design and architecture of the 50’s, Southern California artist Brian Bent’s dynamic illustrative paintings of enamel on plywood are high energy with definitive flying rhomboids and vibrant colors.

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Wednesday, November 16, 2005

Architecture: Palau de les Arts Reina Sofía

Palau de les Arts Reina Sofía
Last month a remarkable building was inaugurated by Spain's Queen Sofia. I'm talking about the new Valencia opera house 'Palau de les Arts Reina Sofía'. Its nautical forms suggest its closeness to the sea and its setting in the former bed of the river Turia.

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Tuesday, November 01, 2005

Architecture: Jenga Sears Tower

Jenga
This is by far my biggest and tallest tower to date. This scale model of the Sears Tower is thirty feet tall, consist of over 15,000 Jenga blocks, and weighs over 300 pounds.
[via del.icio.us/tag/architecture]

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Monday, October 31, 2005

Architecture: Lollipop Building To Be Revamped

Lollipop BuildingFrom the October 4th New York Times:
Scaffolding is expected to start going up late this week at 2 Columbus Circle, opening the way for a controversial transformation of Edward Durell Stone's building into a new home for the Museum of Arts and Design.
View the photo gallery on Save 2 Columbus Circle.

[via guinn9]

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Sunday, September 25, 2005

Architecture: Rockefeller Center, 1940

Rockefeller CenterRockefeller Center:
Amid a blaze of publicity, the "Radio City" project was officially unveiled to the press on March 5, 1931, a "gleaming white model that slowly revolved against its backdrop of velvet drapes. The reviews were not kind. Weakly conceived," "reckless" and "chaos... a cross section of metropolitan disorder" were some of the comments.

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Thursday, September 15, 2005

Architecture: Villa Savoye By Le Corbusier, 1929

Villa SavoyeVilla Savoye, Poissy by Le Corbusier:
If the Villa Savoye had been a mere demonstration of formal virtuosity it would not have touched expressive depths. The tension of the building relies on the urgent expression of a utopian dream.

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Tuesday, September 06, 2005

Architecture: Tadao Ando Photos By Sanghyun Lee

Photographs of the unusual, the bizarre, the sublime, and the beautiful found in my travels through buildings designed by Tadao Ando in Japan.
[via jeansnow.net]

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Wednesday, August 17, 2005

Architecture: Subway Stations

Metro Arts and Architecture:
Read which metro systems double as the world's longest art galleries and in which cities you can see stunning underground palaces, museums, aquariums, an ancient chapel, the world's first example of computer-generated architecture and other kinds of interesting things in subway stations.
[via Anil Dash]

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Tuesday, July 19, 2005

Architecture: Michael Wolf Photography

Robert Koch Gallery is pleased to present Architecture of Density, an exhibition of large scale color photographs by Michael Wolf. Wolf has lived and worked in Hong Kong for ten years. Stimulated by the region's complex urban dynamics, he makes dizzying photographs of its architecture.

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Sunday, April 10, 2005

Architecture: Toyo Ito Tod's, 2004

Toyo Ito Tod'sFrom Wallpaper*:
Says Ito, 'I realised that all Tod's products are handcrafted with great attention to the natural quality of the leathers. The production steps strongly reflect a love of nature.' So he took his design cue from Omotesando's own bit of greenery, its towering zelkova trees. In an uncharacteristic act of Tokyo preservation, they have been spared, even as buildings have been demolished and rebuilt all around. The distinctive concrete exterior of the Tod's building is both a tree-shaped silhouette and an integral part of the structure.
[Interior and exterior pictures]

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Saturday, March 26, 2005

Architecture: Little Chapel in the Woods, 1939

Little Chapel in the Woods
The Little Chapel, when dedicated by First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt in ceremonies on November 1, 1939, was still unfinished. Work had progressed enough, however, that all in attendance knew that the Chapel was not only a place where nature and art combined beauty but was also a structure worthy of the honor it would later receive as one of Texas' 20 most outstanding architectural achievements.
The building was the first project of architectural firm Ford, Powell & Carson. It was also the site of my wedding in 1994.

[exterior (2.3MB) | interior (180KB)]

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Friday, March 25, 2005

Architecture: Farnsworth House, 1951

Farnsworth House
The Farnsworth House, built by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe in 1951 and located near Plano, Illinois, is one of the most famous examples of modernist domestic architecture and was considered unprecedented in its day. Transcending any traditional domestic function or program, the importance of the house lies rather in the absolute purity and consistency of its architectural idea.

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Saturday, March 19, 2005

Architecture: Gropius House, 1938

Gropius House
Walter Gropius, founder of the German design school known as the Bauhaus, was one of the most influential architects of the 20th century. He designed this house as his family home in 1937, when he came to teach at Harvard's Graduate School of Design.

Modest in scale, the house was revolutionary in impact. It combined the traditional elements of New England architecture -- wood, brick, and fieldstone -- with innovative materials rarely used in domestic settings at that time -- glass block, acoustical plaster, and chrome banisters, along with the latest technology in fixtures.
View great photos of Gropius House on Figure/Ground and read more about the house on Historic New England, including tour information if you are lucky enough to be in the vicinity.

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